Tuesday, March 3, 2015

20C Hungarian music, women, legs, dogs, & goats by Robert Bereny 1887-1953


Robert Bereny (Hungarian artist, 1887-1953) Woman Playing Cello 1928


Robert Bereny (Hungarian artist, 1887-1953) Woman with Cello 1937

Robert Bereny (Hungarian artist, 1887-1953) Self Portrait 1906

In 1904, Bereny was a student of Tivadar Zemplényi, before he went to study in Paris, where he was particularly influenced by Cézanne's art. Politcally he took part in the art life of the Hungarian Soviet Republic, and he was the leader of the department for painting in the Art Directorate. After 1919, he emmigrated to Berlin, which he left to return home in 1926. He worked in Zebegény from 1934. He was awarded the Szinnyei prize in 1936.  Obviously, I am particularly fond of his self-portraits & his bold use of color.

Robert Bereny (Hungarian artist, 1887-1953) Red Dress 1908


Robert Bereny (Hungarian artist, 1887-1953) Woman in a Green Room 1927


Robert Bereny (Hungarian artist, 1887-1953) Woman in Arm Chair 1923


Robert Bereny (Hungarian artist, 1887-1953) Girl Reading 1946-48


Robert Bereny (Hungarian artist, 1887-1953) Self Portrait 1947


17C Woman by Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677)


We have few depictions of women in the 17C British American colonies, but the prints by Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677) allow us to see the hairstyles & fashions being worn on the other side of the Atlantic during the early years of the English colonization of America. 


Wenceslaus Hollar (European-born English artist, 1607-1677) Portrait of a Woman 1642 


Morning Madonna


Fanny Geefs (Belgian artist, 1807–1883) Maria with Child

In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were the core of early Western art.


Monday, March 2, 2015

20C English Music by Stanley Spencer 1891-1959



Stanley Spencer, (English painter, 1891-1959) Music Lesson at Bedales 1921  Bedales School is an independent school situated in the village of Steep, in Hampshire. The school was founded in 1893, by John Haden Badley in reaction to the limitations of conventional Victorian schools. In the first half of 20th century the progressive movement around Bedales attracted a community of artists, craftsmen & writers to live in Steep. In the early 1920s Stanley Spencer made a number of drawings & paintings of activities at the school, while staying with Muirhead Bone.

Spencer's father was a musician & taught him to play the piano,  Two sisters who lived at the end of his lane in Cookham, said that he would drop in & say "Can I have a tinkle?" He would sit down at their piano & play Bach & Chopin.



Stanley Spencer, (English painter, 1891-1959) At the Piano 1957


17C Woman by Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677)


We have few depictions of women in the 17C British American colonies, but the prints by Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677) allow us to see the hairstyles & fashions being worn on the other side of the Atlantic during the early years of the English colonization of America. 


Wenceslaus Hollar (European-born English artist, 1607-1677) Portrait of a Woman 1642 


Morning Madonna


Jaume Serra (Catalonean artist, d c 1405) Virgen de Tobed 1359

In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were the core of early Western art.


Sunday, March 1, 2015

Origin of Saying "March Comes in Like a Lion..."


1600s Woodcut Windie Winter

Today is March 3rd, and it is snowing again here in the Chesapeake. Time to revisit the origin of the saying "March comes in like a lion and out like a lamb." Some claim that the saying applies to the relative positions of constellations at the beginning and end of the month of March. Leo, the Lion,(Eastern horizon) and Aries, the Ram or Lamb (Western horizon).

But it looks as if English playwright John Fletcher may have pointed the way toward the saying in 1624 when he wrote, "I would chuse March, for I would come in like a Lion...But you'd go out like a Lamb when you went to hanging." John Fletcher (English playwright, 1579-1625) penned this in his play A Wife for a Month, a tragicomedy (Licensed 27 May 1624; 1647) in Scene II. Act I.

A little later in the 17th century, English naturalist & writer John Ray confirmed the connection when he noted, "March hack ham [hackande = annoying] comes in like a lion, goes out like a lamb." This appears in 1670, in a book written by John Ray (English naturalist, 1627-1705), the Catalogue of English Proverbs. p 41.

In the British American colonies, the phrase "March came in like a lion" shows up in Ames Almanack in 1740, and in William Byrd's Another Secret Diary published in the same year. America's 2nd president John Adams notes in his diary in 1788, "The month (March) comes in like and lion, and according to the farmer's proverb it must go out like a lamb."

English Woodcut


March 1781


1781 The Twelve Months print; Carington Bowles (Published by) Robert Dighton (After) Richard Earlom (Print made by) London


March 1767


1767 March. Printed for Robert Sayer, London.


March 1749


1749 March print John June (Print made by) D Voisin (Published by) London


March 1745


1745 Thomas Burford (British artist, 1710-1770) March


March 1730


1730 Jacob van Huysum (1686-1740) Twelve Months of Flowers 3 March


March 1678


1678-1700  Twelve Months March print Henri II Bonnart (Published by)  Paris


March 1610


1609-10 MARCH Twelve months March print Jacques Callot (Print made by) Adriaen Collaert (After) Joos de Momper 


March 1500s


Anonymous woodcut after 1568 Étienne Delaune (French artist, 1518-1595) Labours of the Months 

March 1580


1580 Italian School The Labours of the Months 3 March


March 1515


1515 Da Costa Hours, in Latin Illuminated by Simon Bening (1484–1561) Belgium, Bruges, c 1515 March Two Workmen in a Garden


Morning Madonna


Madonna and Child Nursing. Early Flemish School 16th century

In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were the core of early Western art.


Saturday, February 28, 2015

Morning Madonna


Jacob van Oost the Elder (Belgian artist, 1601–1671) The Holy Family

In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were the core of early Western art.


Friday, February 27, 2015

American Folk Art - Children with Pets by Unknown Artists



Unknown American artist.  Three Cummins Children and a Dog of Lafayette, NJ 1845



Unknown American artist.  Boy & Dog on the Hudson River



Unknown American artist.  Lydia and Tabitha the Cat



Unknown American artist.  Boy with a Dog



Unknown American artist.  Girl with a Loop & a Dog



Unknown American artist.  Boy with a Cat 1845



Unknown American artist.  Two Children with a Dog



Unknown American artist.  Elijah Thompson with His Puppy 1838



Unknown American artist.  Regina and Richard Mason with Kitten 1819



Unknown American artist.  Jean MacDonald Lee Myers with Woodpecker 1850



Unknown American artist.  Probably by Susan Catherine Moore Waters (American artist, 1823-1900) Probably Girls from Southern New York state. c 1845



Unknown American artist.  Boy in Gray with Dog c 1820